The Ancient Battle of Troy 

Trojan-War

The battle of Troy is suspected to have occurred in modern day Turkey as Troy considered is by archeologists and scholars to have been a real citadel, and not just an epic iliad of the ancient Greek poet Homer. The Trojan economy was based upon trade, specifically horses and horse breeding which allowed for wealth and military prowess within the walls of Troy, as horses were rarely seen elsewhere in the ancient world. Troy had a large ditch cut around the entire city, similar to a moat but without water. Large fences were placed behind this trench and enormous city walls were erected with only 3 entry points for the entire stronghold. Food stockpiles allowed the Trojans to hold out for longer periods than what would typically have been possible and amphorae were buried all over the Troy, up to the neck of the container, with a rock placed on top to seal it off. The Trojans, as was custom with most ancient people, would not bury their dead within the perimeter of the city unless under significant stress. Militarily speaking, in order to seize a target by assault, a soldier ratio of 3:1 is required but the Greeks did not have this advantage because the Trojan’s and Greek’s were matched evenly in terms of troops. This lack of superiority on either side permitted the Trojan war to last 9 years. The Trojans built their outer walls on a 20 degree slant to protect themselves from siege towers which were essentially mobile ladders with platforms to shoot down from. Troy’s exterior stone walls were 6 meters high with an additional height of 4 meters being added by mud-brick structures which crowned the walls. The Trojan Horse which invaded Troy was most likely was 13′ tall and less than 7′ wide, holding 30 – 40 men. Once Troy was successfully invaded, it was sacked, it’s citizens were pillaged and slaughtered, and its royal family raped and murdered. Even children were not immune to the scourge of this bloody battle as Homer’s iliad speaks of children being thrown to their death from great heights

The First Novel Ever Written 

The-Tale-of-Genji

The Tale of Genji is a classic work of Japanese literature written by the noblewoman and lady-in-waiting Murasaki Shikibu in the early years of the 11th century, around the peak of the Heian period. The Tale of Genji is referred to as the world’s first novel, the first modern novel, the first psychological novel, and the first novel still to be considered a classic

Capital Punishment In Japan

Japanese-capital-punishment

Capital punishment is legal in Japan and is applicable for convicted murderers only. The Japanese government regularly polls its citizens to gauge where public opinion lay in respect to this form of punishment. Typically, polls show approximately 80% of people finding execution by the state permissible, especially if the crime committed is especially egregious or heinous, with 80% of the public being in favor as shortly ago as 2015. Executions are carried out only by hanging

Adolf Hitler’s Perverted View of the Arts 

Adolf-Hitler-artwork

Adolf Hitler attempted to become a watercolorist painter during his early adult life and attended art school. Hitler dropped out and became a politician but he continued to have a deep fascination and appreciation of artwork and architecture, however he harbored strong disdain for modern art. While imprisoned for attempting to challenge the German socialist political party in power at the time, Hitler wrote a manuscript which served as a blueprint for a new kind of German society, and in this manifesto he characterized modern art as a toxic moral plague upon society, pestilence sent by Russian communists and sold by Jewish art dealers to infect Germany with cubism, and other forms of Bolshevist viewpoints

The Rationale For the Iconic Green Color of the U.S. Military 

military-camouflage

The decision of the United States military to design equipment with its iconic green shade was made during the 19th century. It was during this time that European chemists developed a new type of paint which could rustproof iron. This new creation happened to be green which is why the U.S. military continues to use that particular shade. Technology has long allowed for the advent of rustproofing materials in any color imaginable but because the color originally used works well with camouflage, it is still in use

The Original Target of Nuclear Warfare in Japan During World War II 

Ryoanji-Temple-Japan

The Ryōan-ji (pronounced “rai-oh-anne-jee”) temple garden in Kyoto, Japan was the intended target of the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan during World War II. The American Secretary of State Harry Stimpson, who visited the Ryōan-ji temple garden during his travels throughout the world, lobbied against the bombing of this garden and other gardens around it located in Kyoto as he had appreciated the gardens beauty and significance to Japanese culture. Because Stimpson was steadfast in his opposition to the bombing of the Ryōan-ji Temple garden, the site was spared with Nagasaki substituted as Nagasaki was considered an equally suitable target

Bacteria and the Human Body 

bacteria

The human body is an ecosystem and in it is 10,000,000,000,000 (10 trillion) cells and 100,000,000,000,000 (100 trillion) microbes. It’s a ratio of 10:1 meaning that human beings are 90% microbial and only 10% mammalian. There are approximately 7000 different species of microbe within the intestine, approximately 700 different species within the mouth, approximately 300 – 400 different species within the vagina, and approximately 700 different species within and found upon the skin. Bacteria perform a myriad of tasks which includes regulating metabolic rates and regulating the immune system, among other various tasks