Ansel Adams’ Genius and Process

Ansel-Adams

The American photographer Ansel Adams pushed the mechanical process of photography into an art form during the 1920’s. Adams’ method was to work backwards from the image he had visualized within his mind and then anticipate the moment when the light and subject could be seen at their most illuminating. During Adams’ day, color photograph was considered crass, as color photography was considered not to contain nuance and the subtlety which matched the real world. Black and white photography allowed for a beautiful range of tonalities which was abstract but still considered to be realism artwork during the period. Today, with much more sophisticated technology and color materials, the world can be photographed accurately with many different nuances. Ironically, black and white now appears as an abstract artistic medium in comparison to full color photographs

Napoléon Bonaparte’s Erroneous Assumption of Civilization and His Campaign Into Egypt

Napoléon-Bonaparte

Prior to the development of the methods and tools used for scientific analysis, many Europeans regarded Egypt as the birthplace of civilization. This meant that Napoléon Bonaparte was free to invade Egypt because the French people viewed his campaign as a way of leading themselves back to the source of their roots. Bonaparte did not only bring soldiers, he also brought scholars who were tasked to observe and record the knowledge gained while in Egypt. This acquisition of knowledge made information about Egypt available to the public through books filled with illustrations and writing about Egyptian culture, its people, and its landmarks. Elements of Egyptian culture started to work their way into European culture and even reach out west as far as the new colonies of the United States of America, with examples like the pyramid on the back of U.S. currency and the obelisk shaped Washington Monument in Washington D.C., United States of America. Bonaparte’s campaign was the most significant European foray into the Islamic world since the Crusades

The Cuban “Wet Foot Dry Foot” Policy

Cuban-migrant

The Cuban “Wet Foot Dry Foot policy” describes the fact that since 1995, any Cuban who reaches the United States of America will be accepted by the U.S. and therefore able to live and work in the U.S. as a landed immigrant with paperwork to bolster their legitimacy when finding work, applying for loans, and paying income tax. The goal of bringing ones family to join them in the future is why many Cubans have taken on this monumental challenge of traveling from Cuba to the U.S. by boat, often over crowded and hand made which has lead to many deaths by drowning. If caught by the Cuban authorities for trying to flee Cuba, migrants are repatriated and given a fine or jail time in Cuba. Barack Obama ended the Wet Foot Dry Foot policy as his last act in office as President of the United States of America in the hopes of improving diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Cuba

The Sale of Meat In New York City, United States of America During the 19th Century

19th-century-butcher

Butchers in the 19th century often turned rotting meat into sausage so that the meat it was made up of was unidentifiable and palatable. Butchers added the chemical compound Borax which is sodium borate to cover up the scent of the meat because the boracic acid would kill any bacteria present upon the meat. It was later discovered that Borax is ideal for keeping wounds clean, killing cockroaches, and cleaning floors, which provides a clear frame of reference in terms of its potential safety hazards when consumed. The meat would still smell and taste bad and would cause those who consumed it to become sick but despite this, butchers would add red clothing dye made from coal tar which sometimes had arsenic in it to freshen up the grey and brown color of the meat so that it was more visually presentable to consumers. Finally, stale bread or cookies were added to bind everything together before the meat was sold

The Rise of the Electric and Gasoline Automobile to Combat Horse Manure

19th-century-city

In the late 19th century there were 200,000 horses in New York City, United States of America, producing over 400,000 tonnes of manure. Getting rid of this waste was directly what spawned the automobile, both the electric version and the gasoline. The fate of the electric car was sealed in 1908 when Henry Ford launched the Model T. The Model T was mass produced and undercut its cheapest competitor by 33%. Within 5 years of introduction, the automobile eliminated 90% of horses in New York City

The Ancient Vedic Texts

ancient-Vedic-texts

The Vedas are a collection of texts which have not been modified or updated as language has progressed. The term “veda” means “knowledge” in Sanskrit. The Vedic texts were read and understood by Nobel Prize laureate physicists Niels Bohr, Erwin Schrödinger, and Albert Einstein, as well as the immensely influential physicist Robert Oppenheimer and incredibly revolutionary engineer and inventor Nicola Tesla. These texts had a profound influence upon modern thinking and modern physics. In the Rig Veda, creation is said to have begun suddenly and explosively, from an infinitesimal point of pure energy, which is essentially akin to a rudimentary explanation of the Big Bang Theory. Vedic texts are known to be at least 3000 years old but are suspected by many to be much older

The Ancient Greek Invention of the “Soulmate”

soulmate

The notion of a soulmate has its origins in Ancient Greece. Over 2000 years ago, the Greek philosopher Plato postulated that all human beings should be considered perfect, and that each person is tragically split in two at birth, resulting in a species destined to spend the rest of their lives searching for another person who can complete their missing half