Triage

emergency-room

The term “triage” is derived from the French term “trier” meaning “selection” and is suspected to have originated during the Napoleonic Wars from the work of Dominique-Jean Larrey. The term “triage” was used further during World War I by French doctors treating the battlefield wounded at aid stations behind the front. Those responsible for the removal of the wounded from a battlefield or their care afterwards would divide the victims into three categories with the first being those who are likely to live, regardless of the care they receive, the second being those who are unlikely to live, regardless of the care they receive, and the third being those for whom immediate care may have a drastic and/or positive difference in the final outcome of their ability to survive

Captain James Cook

Captain-James-Cook

Captain James Cook of the British Royal Navy was a sea captain as well as a cartographer. Cook circumnavigated the bottom portion of South America and South Africa, in addition to discovering and mapping many different islands including New Zealand, Hawaii, Fiji, Tahiti, and Easter Island as well the fertile east coast of Australia, which he named New South Wales and claimed in the name of Britain. Cook also found islands which had yet to be explored in the Pacific Ocean, discovering new lands on a scale which until that point had not been performed. The maps Cook drafted were so precise that even during the 20th century, sailors were still using them up until the advent of satellite imagery. Additionally, Cook discovered the cure and prevention for scurvy by accidentally stumbling upon the answer after feeding his crew a diet which included orange extract and sauerkraut

The Bubonic Plague

Black-Plague

The Bubonic Plague killed off approximately 66% of Europe during the 1350’s with the exception of Milan, Italy and Kraków, Poland. This was due to the people of Milan understanding that quarantining the city was a necessary requirement to help aide in the cessation of disease proliferation. Quarantining was performed despite physicians not properly and/or fully understanding the mechanics of viral and bacterial infection. The citizens of Milan also burned down the home of any person or family suspected of having recently contracted the Black Plague. Kraków was a prominent refuge for people of Jewish descent, as Jewish people were used as scapegoats as to the reason why the Black Plague occurred in Europe in the first place. Due to the fact that Jews frequently bathed as it was not in conflict with their religious beliefs, unlike most others in Europe, the Black Plague was barred from having as great of an effect as it did across the rest of Europe. Milan and Kraków were left virtually unscathed with most of their populations surviving the catastrophic epidemic

Death Row In the United States of America

death-row

In the United States of America, an incarcerated person cannot be executed before they are deemed fit to do so by medical personnel. An inmate can be deemed unfit for any number of reasons (e.g. being identified as insane, bleeding from a gunshot wound, unconscious due to head trauma etc.). Inmates are allowed to shower before the execution and they are permitted to wear clothing of their own choosing, doing away with prison attire if they so desire. Inmates are allowed to ask for additional food and drink during their last meal if they consume what was provided to them and reasonable requests for anything else are usually granted. It takes approximately 15 – 20 minutes to complete an execution from the time the inmate is brought from their holding cell to the execution chamber to the time they take their last breath. Strapping the inmate down takes approximately 2 minutes and the intravenous medication used for the execution takes approximately 15 minutes to take full effect. The lethal combination of medications are given in two steps, the first taking approximately 5 minutes before the secondary lethal dose is provided which also takes approximately 5 minutes after which time the inmate continues to live until the medication takes their life which takes approximately another 5 minutes

Triage

battlefield-triage

The term “triage” is derived from the French term “trier” which means “selection” and most likely originated during the Napoleonic Wars from the work of Dominique Jean Larrey. The term “triage” was used more frequently during World War I by French doctors treating those wounded upon the battlefield at the make shift aid stations behind the front. Those responsible for the removal of the wounded from a battlefield or their care afterwards would divide the victims into three categories with the 1st being those who are likely to live, regardless of what care they receive, the 2nd being those who are unlikely to live, regardless of what care they receive, and the 3rd being those for whom immediate care might make a positive difference in outcome