Preventable Death

spirit-in-hospital

The World Health Organization has declared that over 60% of deaths worldwide are caused by non-communicable, preventable disease. These diseases include asthma, diabetes, celiac disease, obesity, cardiovascular disease, some cancers, and select mental disorders. These specific illnesses have continued to rise on an upward trajectory throughout the 21st century with no current sign of leveling off. The World Health Organization estimates that these particular disease processes will increase by a rate of 17% within the next decade and that the cost of treatment has the potential ability to bankrupt the entire global healthcare system by the year 2030, a cost which could topple over $47,000,000,000,000 ($47 trillion). To provide frame of reference, most countries have a total output of less than $1,000,000,000,000 ($1 trillion) per year, a measurement which includes every citizen, business, and system designed to stimulate trade and generate income. The main causative factors for the above mentioned diseases are smoking, consumption of alcohol, adherence to a poor diet, and lack of exercise

Physical Size of Neanderthals

Neanderthal

Neanderthals were on average 6” shorter than human beings, due to their vast musculature caused by androgen hormones within their bodies which may have caused them to act more aggressive than their human counterparts. Neanderthals were barrel-chested with pectoral muscles twice the size that of a human beings chest. While Neanderthals were shorter than humans, their extra muscle mass would mean that a Neanderthal and human being could weigh the same mass but the Neanderthal would be up to 90% stronger than the human

Weight Lost Prior to Bariatric Surgery

bariatric-surgery

The reason bariatric patients are required to lose weight before undergoing bariatric surgery is because the liver becomes enlarged in obese patients and this enlarged liver sits directly atop of the area which needs to be operated upon. Shrinking of the liver is crucial prior to surgery to ensure the surgery is performed as safely as possible

Albert Einstein’s Autopsy

Albert-Einstein

Albert Einstein died of heart failure at the age of 76. Thomas Harvey, the pathologist who performed Einstein’s autopsy removed and held onto Einstein’s brain without telling his superiors, colleagues, or Einstein’s next of kin. When Einstein’s family found out about this event via media news coverage which stated that Einstein’s head was concave during cremation, they were understandably outraged. Harvey sold Einstein’s family upon the idea of allowing him to study Einstein’s brain under the conditions that Harvey never make a profit from doing so, nor use it to garner personal fame. Einstein stated prior to his death that he wished to be cremated as he did not want people visiting his gravesite in reverence or worship of his brilliance. Harvey was not a neurologist by specialty and because of this he had a friend who was a neurosurgeon help him slice Einstein’s brain into 240 cubes and then created at least 12 sets each containing 200 microscopic slides. Harvey was hoping that top researchers from around the world would voluntarily analyze segments of Einstein’s brain to collectively come up with a reason for his brilliance but to his surprise he found that no one wanted to be associated with the project or Harvey himself