The Sale of Meat In New York City, United States of America During the 19th Century

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Butchers in the 19th century often turned rotting meat into sausage so that the meat it was made up of was unidentifiable and palatable. Butchers added the chemical compound Borax which is sodium borate to cover up the scent of the meat because the boracic acid would kill any bacteria present upon the meat. It was later discovered that Borax is ideal for keeping wounds clean, killing cockroaches, and cleaning floors, which provides a clear frame of reference in terms of its potential safety hazards when consumed. The meat would still smell and taste bad and would cause those who consumed it to become sick but despite this, butchers would add red clothing dye made from coal tar which sometimes had arsenic in it to freshen up the grey and brown color of the meat so that it was more visually presentable to consumers. Finally, stale bread or cookies were added to bind everything together before the meat was sold

The Rise of the Electric and Gasoline Automobile to Combat Horse Manure

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In the late 19th century there were 200,000 horses in New York City, United States of America, producing over 400,000 tonnes of manure. Getting rid of this waste was directly what spawned the automobile, both the electric version and the gasoline. The fate of the electric car was sealed in 1908 when Henry Ford launched the Model T. The Model T was mass produced and undercut its cheapest competitor by 33%. Within 5 years of introduction, the automobile eliminated 90% of horses in New York City

Moroccan Slavery

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Slavery has not been abolished in Morocco and is technically still legal even during the modern day. Many people have parents, or grandparents who were born into slavery and have experienced slavery first hand. An estimated 13,000,000 (13 million) slaves were transported north across the Sahara Desert, a number similar in size to those who forced into slavery during the 18th and 19th century in the U.S.. In Morocco there are entire villages of people who descend from the lineage of slaves who were forced along the salt roads of West Africa

The Rationale For the Iconic Green Color of the U.S. Military 

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The decision of the United States military to design equipment with its iconic green shade was made during the 19th century. It was during this time that European chemists developed a new type of paint which could rustproof iron. This new creation happened to be green which is why the U.S. military continues to use that particular shade. Technology has long allowed for the advent of rustproofing materials in any color imaginable but because the color originally used works well with camouflage, it is still in use