The Link Between Dementia and Iron

Alzheimer's-Disease

Measuring iron in the brain is the best known way to confirm dementia without performing an autopsy after death. The brain naturally creates tiny bits of iron referred to as “magnetite”. As a human being ages, more and more iron accumulates within the brain. Too much iron however, is a hallmark of dementia. It is theorized that this overproduction of iron is actually due to external factors like pollution rather than naturally occurring phenomena. Dr. Barbara Marr, a world renowned expert and authority in respect to the measurement of metal in incredibly small particles, took thin tissue sections of affected brains obtained during autopsy and observed them under a highly resolved transmission electronmicroscope to review the particles within the neurons of the brain and found 2 different shapes of particle. The magnetite particles are beautifully crystalline, regular and geometric, whilst the opposing particles were rounded in shape, referred to as “spherls” or “nanospheres”, rounded in shape because they were originally molten droplets. For every 1 biologically manufactured magnetite, 100 artificially implanted foreign particles of iron are found within the brains of those affected by this condition as confirmed by a study which took place in Mexico City, Mexico. Although not definitely proven, the shape of these secondary particles is remarkably similar to that of airborne pollution, which suggests to scientists that there is a discernible correlation between the 2 types

Albert Einstein’s Autopsy

Albert-Einstein

Albert Einstein died of heart failure at the age of 76. Thomas Harvey, the pathologist who performed Einstein’s autopsy removed and held onto Einstein’s brain without telling his superiors, colleagues, or Einstein’s next of kin. When Einstein’s family found out about this event via media news coverage which stated that Einstein’s head was concave during cremation, they were understandably outraged. Harvey sold Einstein’s family upon the idea of allowing him to study Einstein’s brain under the conditions that Harvey never make a profit from doing so, nor use it to garner personal fame. Einstein stated prior to his death that he wished to be cremated as he did not want people visiting his gravesite in reverence or worship of his brilliance. Harvey was not a neurologist by specialty and because of this he had a friend who was a neurosurgeon help him slice Einstein’s brain into 240 cubes and then created at least 12 sets each containing 200 microscopic slides. Harvey was hoping that top researchers from around the world would voluntarily analyze segments of Einstein’s brain to collectively come up with a reason for his brilliance but to his surprise he found that no one wanted to be associated with the project or Harvey himself