The Nest of the Edible-Nest Swiflet and its High Economic Value

swiftlet-birds-nest

Birds nests made by edible-nest swiftlets using solidified saliva is highly prized all throughout Asia with a single kilogram selling for over $2000.00. Edible-nest swiftlet nests are believed by those who subscribe to the practice of eastern, more specifically Chinese medicine, to boost the immune system, improve skin complexion, and to fight signs of aging, however none of these claims have been backed up with scientific evidence. Edible-nest swiftlets prefer to create their nests in dark caves, so aside from farming them in specialized dark rooms, acquiring them in nature is incredibly dangerous as steep and sheer cliffs must be scaled to reach the nests which are precariously high above ground level. It takes edible-nest swiftlets 40 days to make a single nest and nests can only be produced during the breeding season which is when the edible-nest swiftlets salivary glands engorge

The Evolution of the Eye

eye

The eye has developed within the animal kingdom for one reason only; to detect the world around the observer. The first evolved eyes were simply an apparatus which had a light sensitive cell referred to as “rhodopsin”. Eventually as time progressed, eyes developed a spherical shape which allowed more light to be captured so that the difference between light and dark was more distinct. Following this, eyes evolved the ability to develop a pupil which acts as a biological aperture which can constrict and dilate letting either more or less light into the eye. This system works in theory but the real world application developed a problem in that when constricting the pupil to focus on an object being looked at, less light is let in which restricts vision. Nature eventually alleviated this issue by placing a lens behind the aperture of the pupil which allowed for precision detail, clarity, and focus. This system was so effective that evolution produced some form of it for nearly every animal and insect on Earth, some being more adept than others, but all using the same principal of light and focus to observe information around them