The Japanese Replica Home of Beatrix Potter

Beatrix-Potter-replica-home

Beatrix Potter’s work is highly popular in Japan as her stories were translated into Japanese relatively early on with the first translation released in 1917. Potter’s stories were used to teach English primarily but also served to entertain young children which is why her works are considered culturally important in Japan. A replica of Potter’s English countryside home has been erected in Tokyo, Japan upon the grounds of a children’s zoo situated near Daito Bunka University. The replica home is of Potter’s former home, Hill Top Farm and is exactly 33% larger than the actual home Potter lived and worked in

The Etymology of the Name “Jehova”

Hebrew-Jehova

The name “Jehova” (pronounced “yah-ho-vah”) is derived from the Hebrew name “יְהֹוָה‎” (pronounced “yo-vah”) which is based upon the Masoretic version of the Biblical Hebrew name “יהוה‎” (pronounced “yah-ho”). The name Jehova and all of its predecessors means “my lord” in Hebrew. The name Jehova is derived from the Greek “Iesous” (pronounced “ease-us”), from which the English name “Jesus” is derived. This Greek name is a rendering of the Hebrew name “ישוע‎” (pronounced “yeh-shu-ah”) which is a variant of the base Hebrew name “יהושע‎” (pronounced “yo-shu-ah”). In English, this name is referred to as “Joshua”. The name “Christ” is derived from the Greek term “khristos” (pronounced “kris-tus”) which means “anointed” and is based upon the Greek term “khriein” (pronounced “kree-in”) which means “anoint”. Both of these Greek terms are derived from the Hebrew term “משיח” (pronounced “mi-sha”) which means “messiah”. The term “messiah” as well as the Hebrew name “משיח” mean “anointed”, as their Greek counterpart does. This effectively means that Jesus Christ, messiah, and Jehova are all the same term with the same meaning as they are based upon the same root words and have the same translation

William Ockham’s Philosophical Thought Experiment

William of Ockham was an English Franciscan friar, scholastic philosopher, and theologian who posited the question, “is something good because God wills it or does God will something because it is good?”. This essentially translates to “if God is infinite and always good, there cannot be evil in the world, but evil clearly exists, therefore God cannot be infinite and always good, ipso facto, is there really a God?”. William of Ockham is the person behind the theory of simplicity referred to as “Ockham’s razor” most often spelled as “Occam‘s razor”

Charles Darwin’s “Survival of the Fittest”

Charles-Darwin

When Charles Darwin created the phrase “survival of the fittest”, he did so before the term “ecosystem” was commonly used within the English vernacular. Darwin originally intended to state that the species or organism which fit in best with its environment, would have the most probable chance of survival. It is a common misconception that Darwin was referring to physical attributes like strength, speed, and fight or flight endurance