The Freemasonic Society

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As of 2012, there are an estimated 6,000,000 (6 million) Freemasons worldwide. It is believed by some experts that the Freemason fraternity was established during the building of Solomon’s Temple, which occurred in 1000 B.C.. The original universal symbol of the Freemason society has a geometric compass at the top, letter “G” in the middle, and a squared ruler at the bottom. The compass is considered the main tool of the Freemason and stands for the perfect circle it draws in which a Freemason can stand. It is believed by the Freemasons that when having gone outside of this circle, a Freemason will find trouble and lose control. The only way to enlarge the circle is to seek knowledge. The square is iconography designed to represent wisdom and virtue. The letter “G” represents the “grand architect of the universe” but also can be interpreted as God or geometry, as it is believed by some experts that God is a grand architect and that geometry, specifically sacred geometry is the language of the universe. The goal of the Freemason organization is to promote free thinking, as it is believed that doing so is the only way to inoculate oneself from any tyrannical person or organization set out to enslave civilization

Zoroastrianism and its Relation to Noah’s Ark

zoroastrianism

Zoroastrianism is one of the world’s oldest monotheistic religions, founded by the prophet Zoroaster in ancient Iraq, approximately 3500 years ago. The central God of the religion is a deity named Ahura Mazda, who is often depicted as sitting inside a winged disc. According to the Zoroastrian text referred to as the “Vendidad”, it was foretold to the prince Yima that a future cataclysm was on the horizon which included a long serpent making it’s way to the Earth ushering in a winter unlike any seen before, perhaps interpreted in the modern day as an asteroid strike. Yima was provided detailed instructions to build an underground asylum referred to as a “vara”. Yima was also instructed to collect a vast seed bank repertoire and to collect a male and female of every animal used for livestock. It is hypothesized by some scholars that this story was mistaken and transcribed wrong which lead to the advent of the story of Noah’s ark

The Arc of the Covenant

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The Hebrew term for “ark” translates to “closet” or “cupboard” when taken literally. It’s estimated that it took 60 kilograms of gold to build the Ark of the Covenant, a feat which would require nearly 20,000 wedding rings to provide a modern perspective. The ark was measured in cubits which was a biblical measurement approximately the length of an adult male forearm, with the ark itself being 4 cubits in length by 1.5 cubits height and 1.5 cubits wide. The ark is described within the Bible as the “throne of God”. This symbolism was most likely borrowed from the Egyptians as a similar shrine was found within the tomb of Tutankhamun, guarded by the Egyptian god Anubis, remarkably similar to the way in which it is described to be guarded by God in the Bible. Portable shrines were incredibly common in ancient Egypt and although the Bible states that the Ark of the Covenant was instructed by God, it clearly was manufactured using borrowed ideas, religious motifs, and building techniques. Although Ethiopia vehemently protests that the Ark of the Covenant resides within a single temple in Ethiopia, most experts believe that it was destroyed by the Babylonians during the destroying of the temple in which the Ark of the Covenant was held, in 586 A.D.. The alternate theory is that the Ark of the Covenant has simply fallen apart due to the ravages of time and therefore no longer exists anywhere in the world

William Ockham’s Philosophical Thought Experiment

William of Ockham was an English Franciscan friar, scholastic philosopher, and theologian who posited the question, “is something good because God wills it or does God will something because it is good?”. This essentially translates to “if God is infinite and always good, there cannot be evil in the world, but evil clearly exists, therefore God cannot be infinite and always good, ipso facto, is there really a God?”. William of Ockham is the person behind the theory of simplicity referred to as “Ockham’s razor” most often spelled as “Occam‘s razor”

Renaissance Law Regarding Women’s Rights

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During the Renaissance, rape was not recognized in the contextual mindscape that it is today. Rape was seen as a dishonorable stamp upon the family and the families name of the victim. If rape occurred, it was not uncommon for the offender to marry the victim, therefore making the act acceptable within the eyes of the family, the court, and as was thought at the time, in the eyes of God. Rape of a woman who was no longer a virgin was essentially considered not to be a crime, however rape of a woman who was a virgin, was considered to be very serious until sorted out. It was not uncommon for an aggressor to pay a dowry to the victim and her family so that she could marry another man, if the offender had no interest in marrying said victim. Dowries were considered unideal but an acceptable practice during this period. A daughters virginity being intact was viewed as a significant financial gain towards the women’s family as it was customary to receive a sizeable dowry when she became married. A notable historical example of this ideology is directly correlated to the incredibly talented Renaissance painter Artemisia Gentileschi, who was raped by a painter her father Orazio who was also a famous painter, commissioned to teach his daughter the art of sketching using proper perspective and dimension