The Ancient Battle of Troy 

Trojan-War

The battle of Troy is suspected to have occurred in modern day Turkey as Troy is considered is by archeologists and scholars to have been a real citadel, and not just an epic iliad of the ancient Greek poet Homer. The Trojan economy was based upon trade, specifically horses and horse breeding which allowed for wealth and military prowess within the walls of Troy, as horses were rarely seen elsewhere in the ancient world. Troy had a large ditch cut around the entire city, similar to a moat but without water. Large fences were placed behind this trench and enormous city walls were erected with only 3 entry points for the entire stronghold. Food stockpiles allowed the Trojans to hold out for longer periods than what would typically have been possible and amphorae were buried all over the Troy, up to the neck of the container, with a rock placed on top to seal it off. The Trojans, as was custom with most ancient people, would not bury their dead within the perimeter of the city unless under significant stress. Militarily speaking, in order to seize a target by assault, a soldier ratio of 3:1 is required but the Greeks did not have this advantage because the Trojan’s and Greek’s were matched evenly in terms of troops. This lack of superiority on either side permitted the Trojan war to last 9 years. The Trojans built their outer walls on a 20 degree slant to protect themselves from siege towers which were essentially mobile ladders with platforms to shoot down from. Troy’s exterior stone walls were 6 meters high with an additional height of 4 meters being added by mud-brick structures which crowned the walls. The Trojan Horse which invaded Troy was most likely was 13′ tall and less than 7′ wide, holding 30 – 40 men. Once Troy was successfully invaded, it was sacked, it’s citizens were pillaged and slaughtered, and its royal family raped and murdered. Even children were not immune to the scourge of this bloody battle as Homer’s iliad speaks of children being thrown to their death from great heights

Death Row In the United States of America

death-row

In the United States of America, an incarcerated person cannot be executed before they are deemed fit to do so by medical personnel. An inmate can be deemed unfit for any number of reasons (e.g. being identified as insane, bleeding from a gunshot wound, unconscious due to head trauma etc.). Inmates are allowed to shower before the execution and they are permitted to wear clothing of their own choosing, doing away with prison attire if they so desire. Inmates are allowed to ask for additional food and drink during their last meal if they consume what was provided to them and reasonable requests for anything else are usually granted. It takes approximately 15 – 20 minutes to complete an execution from the time the inmate is brought from their holding cell to the execution chamber to the time they take their last breath. Strapping the inmate down takes approximately 2 minutes and the intravenous medication used for the execution takes approximately 15 minutes to take full effect. The lethal combination of medications are given in two steps, the first taking approximately 5 minutes before the secondary lethal dose is provided which also takes approximately 5 minutes after which time the inmate continues to live until the medication takes their life which takes approximately another 5 minutes