Zoroastrianism and its Relation to Noah’s Ark

zoroastrianism

Zoroastrianism is one of the world’s oldest monotheistic religions, founded by the prophet Zoroaster in ancient Iraq, approximately 3500 years ago. The central God of the religion is a deity named Ahura Mazda, who is often depicted as sitting inside a winged disc. According to the Zoroastrian text referred to as the “Vendidad”, it was foretold to the prince Yima that a future cataclysm was on the horizon which included a long serpent making it’s way to the Earth ushering in a winter unlike any seen before, perhaps interpreted in the modern day as an asteroid strike. Yima was provided detailed instructions to build an underground asylum referred to as a “vara”. Yima was also instructed to collect a vast seed bank repertoire and to collect a male and female of every animal used for livestock. It is hypothesized by some scholars that this story was mistaken and transcribed wrong which lead to the advent of the story of Noah’s ark

Reason Monogamy Was Created

monogamy

Sexual monogamy and the control of women’s reproductive rights by men became an important issue to society as an economic response to agriculture. Sexual monogamy became a problem when men who owned property and livestock wanted to pass down an inheritance to their sons, as they needed to ensure their bloodline was pure without any sons born of another male. Prior to this, predominantly in hunter-gatherer societies, monogamy was not considered a vital tenant of society and straying outside the confines of monogamy was widely accepted as a societal and sometimes even cultural normative due to the unrestricted freedom of time and location of where one was during the day, however after the advent of agriculture, time was drastically different in its allocation amongst women and men as certain duties were required to be performed to ensure a proper harvest

Traditional Mongolian Livestock Practices

MongoliaIn Mongolia, horse is traditionally eaten during the winter months, and is referred to as a “cold meat”. The traditional method of slaughtering livestock is to hold it down, make a small incision in its abdomen, and finally separate the heart from the remaining circulatory system. This technique is an incredibly quick process which if done correctly is a fairly humane way to take the life of an animal. The animal may tense its limbs but it rarely if ever makes a sound during the process as it’s such a quick set of movements performed in succession. Mongolians attach a spiritual significance to blood and it is deemed wrong for any blood to touch the ground during the skinning process. Livestock blood is consumed and is considered a valuable food resource, never to be wasted