The Link Between Dementia and Iron

Alzheimer's-Disease

Measuring iron in the brain is the best known way to confirm dementia without performing an autopsy after death. The brain naturally creates tiny bits of iron referred to as “magnetite”. As a human being ages, more and more iron accumulates within the brain. Too much iron however, is a hallmark of dementia. It is theorized that this overproduction of iron is actually due to external factors like pollution rather than naturally occurring phenomena. Dr. Barbara Marr, a world renowned expert and authority in respect to the measurement of metal in incredibly small particles, took thin tissue sections of affected brains obtained during autopsy and observed them under a highly resolved transmission electronmicroscope to review the particles within the neurons of the brain and found 2 different shapes of particle. The magnetite particles are beautifully crystalline, regular and geometric, whilst the opposing particles were rounded in shape, referred to as “spherls” or “nanospheres”, rounded in shape because they were originally molten droplets. For every 1 biologically manufactured magnetite, 100 artificially implanted foreign particles of iron are found within the brains of those affected by this condition as confirmed by a study which took place in Mexico City, Mexico. Although not definitely proven, the shape of these secondary particles is remarkably similar to that of airborne pollution, which suggests to scientists that there is a discernible correlation between the 2 types

World Renowned Porcelain of Jingdezhen, China

Jingdezhen-China-porcelain

The city of Jingdezhen, China had for centuries been the ceramic capital of China, but it was the manufacturing of porcelain which gave China it’s first world recognized brand, built off of the back of the Ming vase. If the emperor requested a piece of pottery from Jingdezhen, 10 identical pieces would be manufactured, with only 2 being sent to the emperor. The remaining 8 pieces could not be touched by human hands and subsequently were destroyed in the imperial kiln

Ancient Stained Glass Manufacturing

ancient-stained-glass

The manufacturing of stained glass is an ancient technology which dates back so far that the ancient Egyptians knew how to do it 2000 years before the birth of Jesus Christ. Medieval Europe inherited this form of technology but did not invent it as is common belief. Deep, rich blue glass was very difficult to make and therefore needed to be imported from southern Italy. The deep blues which the Chartres Cathedral in Chartres, France is so famous for can historically be traced through documentation to fragments coming from the Byzantine Empire as well as the Roman Empire. These imports were melted down and used to create new glass. Most colors and dyes came from the natural world in the forms of roots, berries, barks, leaves, minerals, and crushed insects, but the most prized colors were imported into Europe from the east, specifically India and China using Ottoman trade routes. The simple luck of geography made Venice, Italy an incredibly wealthy city as it acted as a nexus between the east and west. The blue hue referred to as “ultramarine” was the most expensive color to acquire and therefore it was almost always saved for depictions of the Virgin Mary, typically in her cloak or some other form of clothing, as Mary was depicted as the focal point of every painting she appeared within. Ultra Marine came from the mineral of lapis lazuli and when it was ground up into powder, some parts would inevitably become smaller than others which allowed these particles to reflect more light and provide a deeper, richer color to work with and appreciate. Vermillion Red was almost as precious as ultramarine, and has been used in Europe for hundreds of years in various illuminated manuscripts. Made from the mineral cinnabar, vermillion was adopted in places outside of Europe like meso-America for painting, India for bindi dots, and China to create lacquerware

The Effect of Chinese Investment Capital Upon the Vancouver, Canada Housing Market

Vancouver-Canada-housing-market

In 2015, $1,000,000,000,000 ($1 trillion) USD left China which set a new historic record for the amount of currency exported from China within a single year. This dump of currency directly coincided with the July 2015 real estate jump of 30% – 40% of Vancouver, Canada the Greater Vancouver area and the Fraser Valley. Many economists and financial experts working in China have correctly predicted a growing problem in which the financial bubbles that have been created in China have caused investors to become spooked and therefore cash out of these bubbles to put their income into hard assets around the world. This creates a bubble in other markets which are international, which would lead to the plausible conclusion that the Vancouver, Greater Vancouver area, and Fraser Valley real estate markets are now bubbled in that they have taken the place of many Chinese companys valuations and debts (e.g. stocks and bonds) within the Chinese market. It is estimated that 90% of condominium sales in Vancouver are due to speculative buyers who are often offshore and never set foot in the asset they purchase yet they are paying top dollar, making home costs surge ever further for those who actually live and work in said market. Some of this activity is thought to be due to the ability to create offshore tax havens by owning property outside of one’s country of residence. Most of the condominiums built in Vancouver are single bedroom units, which act as safety deposit boxes for investors as families cannot physically fit into such tight quarters and therefore these units are designed so that the only people purchasing them will be investors and single individuals if they can afford it. It has been said that Vancouver is a manufacturing city which manufactures condominiums; the only caveat is that the exports manufactured stay put making future condominiums worth even more as there is less and less space available to build continuously with consistency. The resource of land is finite and unless buyers are willing to move further out from this hotspot economy, they will be forced to rent or live in less than acceptable living conditions, and sometimes both

Methanol Energy Production 

methanol-plant

Methanol is the simplest alcohol to make and is the most probable choice fuel for future Mars missions. Ethanol only requires water and carbon. Methanol is colloquially referred to as “wood alcohol” and/or “natural gas”. Professional racing car drivers prefer methanol as a fuel source due to the fact that it’s much less likely to catch fire after a crash. Methanol burns incredibly clean in comparison to gasoline and methanol costs 33% of what gasoline costs to manufacture and distribute