South Korean Culture and the Importance of Facial Symmetry and Beauty

South-Korean-gwansang

Facial structure is incredibly important in South Korea and professionals are available who specialize physiognomy, the practice of reading facial features the same way palm readers read the lines of the palm to determine ones supposed fortune (e.g. the forehead supposedly represents luck, up to the age of 30, as well as a person’s parents luck and the nose represents oneself in their entirety and can also be indicative of wealth). The facial reading process is a pseudoscience similar to phrenology of the 19th century. The practice of facial queue reading is actually quite commonplace with top employers like Samsung, LG, and Kia using facial reading experts to help decide who the company should hire for various positions. The body is also accounted for in this reading, but on a much smaller scale. Facial readers claim to be able to predict and decode a persons fortune, career, and wealth, not only for the person being examined, but also of their parents. This process is referred to in Korean as “gwansang”

Kenyan Female Marriage Traditions

kuria-kenya-woman-to-woman-marraige

8 hours from Nairobi, Kenya is Kuria, Kenya, a village in which most men have multiple wives and women often marry other women. The tradition of female to female marriage is referred to as “Nyumba Mboke” (pronounced “nee-yom bom-bah-kay”). Woman to woman marriage is actually quite common across the African continent. The reason female intersex marriages are common is due solely to the birth of a male heir. When African women grow into adulthood, they typically leave their families to move in with the families of their husbands, taking over for their husband’s parents in the various chores of daily life (e.g. cooking, cleaning, acquiring water and firewood etc.). In contrast to this, males always stay with their family and bring their wife to live within their home so that she can take care of the mans aging parents. When a woman cannot produce a male heir or when every male heir she has birthed dies, a secondary wife is usually taken on to help birth new life. Older and more established families often take on a wife for the head wife of the family as a sort of surrogate daughter-in-law