Ancient Druid Power and Influence Upon Society

Ancient-Druid-divination-spoon

The Ancient Druids had tools used for predicting the future with one example being the divination spoons, a small set of golden leaf shaped items which were concave with a small hole upon one of the leaflets. Blood would be blown into this hole using a small tube and the breath of a Druid so that its final patterns could be used to predict the outcome of certain events. This is important because these interpretations were completely subjective (e.g. if a Druid wanted to go to war, many people could potentially die dependent upon how they read these natural signs as prophecies). Manipulation of these results and their prophetic message would be undetectable by common people as only the Druids knew how to read the signs which they were looking for. This opens the door for corruption and/or the tampering of results and their message. The Druids remained so powerful that even Celtic monarchs revered and respected their authority. Despite this enormous influence, apart from divination spoons, definitive and conclusive evidence of Druid prophetic tools have never been found

Islamic Carpet Design

Islamic-carpet

Carpet weaving is thought to have originated in Central Asia more than 2000 years ago, but it was the Islamic culture which shifted it into an art form. Many Islamic traditions have long frowned upon the depiction of sentient beings depicted in western art and because of this, carpet makers created landscapes of bright colors and complex patterns, with the mark of different tribes and ethnic groups recognized by the various dyes and pattern styles utilized. Patterns are so prevalent in Islamic culture because it is a form of expression which is permitted, unlike many others which go against the direct teachings of the Quran. It’s common for patterns to contain an eye somewhere along the line as a protective measure, or a small script to give thanks and praise to Allah, and sometimes even small depictions of hidden meanings like the head of a bird without the rest of its body. Typically, duplicates of the same Islamic carpet are not created, as the artist who created the original design did so because they felt a particular emotion during the creative process and because the same mood is or was not felt during the next carpet, the design is different to reflect the new mood experienced. The golden age of the Islamic carpet occurred during the 17th century when landscape art worked its way into these carpets causing them to become portable gardens of paradise. The images portrayed were not intended to hold a mirror up to nature, but to reflect what human beings value most of nature