King Edward II’s Homosexual Relationship with Piers Gaveston

Edward-II-and-Piers-GavestonPiers Gaveston, a minor noble who engaged in a homosexual relationship with Edward II, may have been overlooked during the 13th century if it were not for the lavish gifts Edward II showered upon Gaveston. Gaveston was exiled from the realm by Edward I for referring to Edward II as his brother. When Edward I died, his son Edward II brought Gaveston back into his kingdom and provided him with money, gold, title, and land. This caused the whole of England to murmur behind closed doors, against the king. It was not so much the act of homosexuality which infuriated the barons, it was the man of whom Edward II fell in love with. The nobles drafted a list of grievances against Edward II referred to as “The Ordinances”. Gaveston eventually fled and was captured by the Scots. Gaveston was sentenced as an enemy of the state and was executed despite Edward II’s attempted intervention

The Peculiarity of King Philip II of Spain 

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King Philip II of Spain was referred to as the “bureaucrat king” because he loved nothing more than to sit in a plain room with documents which he needed to read and sign. Philip II didn’t like human contact or interaction and made his court submit their requests to him via a written document even if they were in the next room. Philip II spoke very quietly and stared at those who spoke to him, often cited as making others feel uncomfortable. Philip II cared only of his empire and his religion of Catholicism and had no interest in building or maintaining relationships with others