Hugh Everett’s “Many World’s” Theory

multiverse

Hugh Everett designed the Many World’s Theory which states that if in the first world a particle is found on the left side, in the second world that same particle is found on the right side, with both findings being equally valid. Everett’s main conclusion was that when a particle splits in 2 to act as a wave, the universe also splits into 2 pieces, only going through 1 of the 2 available slits, but doing so in separate universes. The Many World’s theory is now generally accepted as fact by most physicists, however Everett died before receiving the recognition he deserved for his work. Everett’s theory was treated with a frosty reception when it was first released, as most scientists considered such a theory to be science fiction and speculation rather than proper observed and analyzed fact

Bose-Einstein Condensate

 

Bose-Einstein condensate

When atoms become extremely cold and reach absolute zero on the Kelvin scale they enter what’s referred to as a “Bose-Einstein Condensate” which is a state of matter that causes individual atoms to lose their individual properties thus leading them to mash together and act strangely in their behavioral properties. Atoms become so smeared that their waves start looking indistinguishable from incredibly hot and compressed atoms like the kind found inside the inner core of neutron stars, stars which are so dense that a single teaspoon would weigh 10,000,000,000 (10 billion) tonnes

Rain Drops

rain-drop-ripple

Every time a raindrop hits a puddle or a drop of water hits a larger body of water, it bounces up and down, over and over, held together by its surface tension, and becoming smaller with each bounce, which creates the wave effect observed when a drop of water hits another larger body of water. This phenomena occurs too fast for the human eye to see, but high speed cameras can catch this effect by shooting at thousands or millions of frames per second