The Socioeconomic Reason As To Why Inner-city Schools Are Often Academically Inferior to Suburban Schools and Provide Less Opportunity to Students 

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The reason inner city schools are often gravely underfunded and therefore poorly equipped to provide and meet even the minimum standard of education required by U.S. law is because of the way in which racial integration changed the United Stated of America. Often referred to as “white flight”, as African Americans migrated from the southern U.S. towards the north, many Caucasians became increasingly aware and uncomfortable with their neighbors, particularly of the direction in which their cities were headed. This caused many Caucasians to move away from the city and into suburban areas which resulted in the majority of the Caucasian population no longer being emotionally or financially invested in what occurred in the city which they once resided in. This lack of interest alongside the push by Caucasian’s to ensure Caucasian tax dollars went towards areas of self interest, namely the suburbs surrounding these cities, caused less and less income to flow or even trickle into the city alongside fewer and fewer people who cared what occurred politically inside the city. Over time, inner city educational districts became markedly worse off and gradually this new low came to be accepted as a new normative standard, while suburban school districts had an opposing trajectory as they statistically became able to offer a better standard of education, also being accepted as a new normative standard. This gross dichotomy between the inner city and outer suburbs continued to occur for decades which is why post World War II, the U.S. educational system has been in constant disarray and need of improvement in respect to the opportunities afforded to students to acquire the information they need to compete and succeed in life. The irony of this situation is that no nation on Earth is better equipped to resolve such an issue as the U.S. is the wealthiest nation to have ever been formed

Pablo Picasso’s Politically Charged Guernica Painting

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On April 26, 1937, Guernica, Spain was severely bombed due to civil conflict brought on by World War II. The Basque town of Guernica was openly hostile towards General Francisco Franco’s ideologies, and because of this, Franco unleashed a 3.5 hour bombing raid upon this defenseless city, with help from German allies. In total, 1650 people were killed, 900 injured, and most of the township was destroyed, an event which sparked international outrage. Pablo Picasso created a piece of artwork as sentiment towards anti-war and anti-violence entitled “Guernica”. Picasso understood that artwork and politics rarely go together hand in hand and so he created not a piece of aircraft and bombs but rather of horses and swords, as he was determined not to create artwork which could be used as propaganda in the future. The bull depicted within the painting is designed to represent Franco and his military powers and the suffering horses and weeping woman symbolize the people of Spain. Picasso’s Guernica work became a timeless masterpiece and a copy of it is on display at the United Nations world headquarters in New York City, United States of America. The Guernica painting was covered briefly with a veil during 2003 when U.S. General Colin Powell announced the United States’ decision to invade Iraq. The Guernica image was seen as incendiary commentary and therefore intolerable during this chaotic period. The Guernica painting has become a symbol of protest to violence, war, and military regimes, not just for every country in the world, but of the 20th century and beyond

Effects of the Atomic Bomb Dropped Upon Nagasaki, Japan During World War II

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The atomic bomb dropped upon Nagasaki, Japan on August 6, 1945 was detonated a few thousand feet above the ground as the bomb would have primarily been absorbed by the Earth if it were permitted to touch down. Because the detonation occurred within the air, the force of the first and second blast waves flattened everything within its path. The blast was so bright that atomic shadows were left from anything casting a shadow during the detonation as the light and heat which were the primary components given off during detonation, did not shine as brightly upon the shadows as they did upon everything else. For a few short seconds, the highly enriched uranium created temperatures of tens of millions of degrees Celsius, as if reaching into the core of the sun and dropping that power into the Earth’s atmosphere for a brief moment. The blast emitted was hot enough to melt and fuse anything in touched including granite, steel, iron, glass, clay, and tile

The Original Target of Nuclear Warfare in Japan During World War II 

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The Ryōan-ji (pronounced “rai-oh-anne-jee”) temple garden in Kyoto, Japan was the intended target of the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan during World War II. The American Secretary of State Harry Stimpson, who visited the Ryōan-ji temple garden during his travels throughout the world, lobbied against the bombing of this garden and other gardens around it located in Kyoto as he had appreciated the gardens beauty and significance to Japanese culture. Because Stimpson was steadfast in his opposition to the bombing of the Ryōan-ji Temple garden, the site was spared with Nagasaki substituted as Nagasaki was considered an equally suitable target

The Unsustainability of Massive Debt 

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A major driver of prosperity during the last 50 years of the 20th century has been debt. Prior to World War II, significant debt (e.g. mortgages) did not exist. Debt has been the fundamental driver of all of this forward momentum. This system of prosperity is dependant upon one’s financial ability to service it, and although it is accepted as normal, it is unfortunately unsustainable. This movement has created the enormous financial sector and markets which the industrialized world is now familiar with. The mindset of enjoying now and paying later creates a mindset in which people are divorced from affordability. History has consistently demonstrated that this model is highly volatile and worse, unsustainable in the long run

Nazi German V2 Rocket Production During World War II 

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The V2 rocket was one of the most expensive pieces of weaponry utilized during World War II. The V2 rocket was manufactured under slave labor conditions and although it was successful in its ability to kill 5000 people during its various attacks, 10,000 – 20,000 people died during its production as miscalculations and errors often occurred during the various manufacturing and testing processes. The V2 rocket was primarily built by Russian, Polish, Ukrainian, and French prisoners of war. Overworking, underfeeding, and not providing sanitation caused many deaths to these slave laborers which hindered the ability to produce the unrealistic quota demands Adolf Hitler had requested of the German military. For each V2 rocket which was produced, 6 slave laborers died. Wernher von Braun performed many calculations for the German military in terms of the amount of concentration camp slave laborers required to meet demand quotas as well as how many people were expected to die during each production run. Prisoners were often hung publicly within the labor camps as punishment for resistance or sabotage of the project

Japanese Imperial Sexual Slavery During World War II

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Over 200,000 women and girls were forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II across Asia. The Japanese referred to these people as “comfort women”. Since January 8, 1992, elderly Korean women and their supporters have protested in front of the Japanese embassy in Korea every single Wednesday without fail