Effects of the Atomic Bomb Dropped Upon Nagasaki, Japan During World War II

Nagasaki-Japan-World-War-II

The atomic bomb dropped upon Nagasaki, Japan on August 6, 1945 was detonated a few thousand feet above the ground as the bomb would have primarily been absorbed by the Earth if it were permitted to touch down. Because the detonation occurred within the air, the force of the first and second blast waves flattened everything within its path. The blast was so bright that atomic shadows were left from anything casting a shadow during the detonation as the light and heat which were the primary components given off during detonation, did not shine as brightly upon the shadows as they did upon everything else. For a few short seconds, the highly enriched uranium created temperatures of tens of millions of degrees Celsius, as if reaching into the core of the sun and dropping that power into the Earth’s atmosphere for a brief moment. The blast emitted was hot enough to melt and fuse anything in touched including granite, steel, iron, glass, clay, and tile

Ancient Egyptian Influence Upon European and North

Washington-Monument

Prior to the development of the methods and tools used for scientific analysis, many Europeans regarded Egypt as the birthplace of civilization. This meant that Napoléon Bonaparte was free to invade Egypt because the French people viewed his campaigns as a way of leading themselves back to the source of their roots. Bonaparte did not only bring soldiers, he also brought scholars who would observe and record the knowledge gained while in Egypt. This acquisition of knowledge made information about Egypt available to the public through books filled with illustrations and writing about Egyptian culture, its people, and its landmarks. Elements of ancient Egypt started to work their way into European culture and even reach out west as far as the new colonies of the United States of America, with examples like the pyramid on the back of U.S. currency and the obelisk Washington Monument in Washington D.C.. Bonaparte’s campaign was the most significant European foray into the Islamic world since the Crusades

Medieval Age Armor Of Impoverished Soldiers 

Medival-armor

Poorer soldiers who could not afford armor or chainmail would use a garment referred to as a “gambeson” which consisted of layers of cloth with thick wool sandwiched in between more layers of cloth, similar to the modern advent of Kevlar which is tightly woven layers stacked on top of eachother. The gambeson was sewen extremely tight making it flexible but also somewhat resistant to blows. It wasn’t as effective as armor and chainmail but it did offer moderate protection. Those who could afford it would have covered their gambeson with chainmail as an added layer of protection

German Nazi Torture During World War II

World-War-II-prisoner

Adolf Hitler’s German Nazi soldiers would often psychologically torture prisoners of war by locking them in a small room and providing very little to no food. Perhaps most dastardly, every few days Nazi soldiers would tell a prisoner “you’re getting out tomorrow” which would create hope within the prisoner only to be stamped out when nothing happened. Nazi soldiers would repeatedly say this to prisoners on multiple occasions throughout the prisoner’s detainment

Indian and Pakistani Borders

India-Pakistan-borderBangladesh was once referred to as East Pakistan and modern day Pakistan was referred to as West Pakistan, both being satellite states of India. West Pakistan imposed harsh laws upon East Pakistan including the forcible changing of the national language to Urdu and the forbidding of listening to radio news, most especially the British Broadcasting Network. Bangladesh eventually broke free and gained its independence in 1971